In the current issue of New Daylight

New Daylight

Find out more about New Daylight September-December 2018:

The Editor writes...

As we enter autumn and winter it is tempting to become mournful, sighing for the relaxed greenness of summer months, looking back to the vivid hope of spring. Such reflections can be useful, in that it is in pondering that we learn 'emotion recollected in tranquillity', as Wordsworth describes it. Indeed, one of the key characteristics of Mary, whose nature is explored by Penelope Wilcock in this issue, is the way she holds the events of Jesus' life in her heart and ponders them. Joshua too makes remembering an important part of his leadership, and Fiona Stratta shows Joshua's skill in encouraging the children of Israel to recall God's goodness to them in the past in order to inspire them to live well and faithfully into the future. Nick Read explores the challenging book of Leviticus, with its seemingly endless descriptions of the best way to sacrifice an animal, and shows how adherence to the covenant which God made with this people is both honoured and replaced by Christ's sacrifice on the cross. He demonstrates how a willingness to grapple with Leviticus will help Christians understand the context in which Christ lived and the eternal truths which he brought to fruition.

However, to dwell too long amid memories can sap one's energies for engaging with the present and looking to the future, preventing new growth and progress. Amy Boucher Pye shows us how accepting the forgiveness of Christ for ourselves is as necessary for living fully in Christ as engaging with the challenging task of forgiving others.

This process of forgiveness is just as important in public life as in the domestic sphere. As the nations of the world unite in remembering and mourning the loss of so many lives in the tragedy of World War I at the centenary of its ending, we join our prayers with those of Christians throughout the world as we pledge to work for peace on a worldwide scale. The scarlet poppy, a powerful symbol of blood spilt, is also a sign of new growth and hope for the future: 'To you from failing hands we throw the torch; be yours to hold it high' ('In Flanders Fields' by John McCrae).

As we journey through the autumn and winter months I pray that we may grow in the understanding and love from which spring the shoots of forgiveness.

Sally Welch

In this issue:

Colossians
Stephen Rand

Forgiveness in the gospels
Amy Boucher Pye

Water in John
Debbie Orriss

Joshua 1—7
Fiona Stratta

Humility
Amanda Bloor

Exploring war and peace
Sally Welch

Leviticus
Nick Read

Mary, mother of Jesus
Penelope Wilcock

Christmas with Luke
David Winter

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About the contributors in this issue:

Amanda Bloor is a parish priest on the lsle of Wight, a director of ordinands and a chaplain to a variety of youth and community organisations. She loves engaging with people's questions about faith and encouraging individuals to follow God's calling. In her spare time she enjoys walks on the beach, making music with others and reading voraciously.

Amy Boucher Pye is the author of The Living Cross: Exploring God's gift of forgiveness and new life (BRF, 2016) and the award-winning Finding Myself in Britain (Authentic Media, 2015). She enjoys running the Woman Alive book club and speaking at churches. She blogs at amyboucherpye.com.

Debbie Orriss has been in Christian ministry as a Church Army evangelist for over 20 years. She is currently Discipleship Coordinator for Salisbury Diocese, and is passionate about helping children and adults discover that God loves them to bits and invites them into life in all its fullness.

Stephen Rand is an activist, a writer and a speaker who worked with Tearfund and Open Doors, travelling widely. He is now responsible for the public communications of the All-Party Parliamentary Group on International Freedom of Religion or Belief.

Nick Read, a fellow of the Royal Agricultural Society, is director of the Bulmer Foundation, a sustainable development charity based in Hereford. He is also a volunteer agricultural chaplain with Borderlands Rural Chaplaincy, an ecumenical chaplaincy covering the English-Welsh Marches.

Fiona Stratta is a speech and language therapist, a speech and drama teacher, and the author of Walking with Gospel Women (BRF, 2012), Walking with Old Testament Women (BRF, 2015) and Walking with Biblical Women of Courage (BRF, 2017). In her writings she desires to connect readers' spiritual journeys more closely to their daily lives.

Penelope Wilcock writes Christian fiction, pastoral theology and Bible study. Her books include Spiritual Care of Dying and Bereaved People (BRF, 2013). She blogs at kindredofthequietway.blogspot.co.uk.

David Winter is retired from parish ministry. An honorary Canon of Christ Church, Oxford, he is well known as a writer and broadcaster. His most recent book for BRF is Heaven's Morning: Rethinking our destination.

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